Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Research & Developement

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Founded in 1997, by CEO Leanne Preston, Wild Child has expanded both its product range and distribution channels during the past ten years. Wild Child products are sold throughout Australia, New Zealand, Europe, the UK and now the U.S.

Wild Child was founded by Preston in Margaret River, Australia, following the unpleasant discovery that her youngest daughter had head lice. After consulting her local chemist, Preston was horrified to learn that the most common head lice treatment was a shampoo containing toxic chemicals that can cause illness and even death. Amazingly, not a single natural treatment was available.

After a period of intensive research, Preston developed a prototype of a product (subsequently called “Quit Nits”) which used essential oils to deliver highly effective results. From the beginning, Preston envisaged an export-driven company, having discovered that the gap in the Australian head lice market also existed in the rest of the developed world. The unique characteristics of Quit Nits – that it provides a safe, natural alternative to highly toxic conventional products – are as relevant to overseas markets as they are locally.

A key part of the Wild Child story is the evolution and understanding of the science behind the initial discovery which has subsequently led to the creation of the Biotech Product Development division. This division is focused on natural and nature identical products, including a range of natural sunscreens that are complimentary to the company’s core principles. This line of sunscreen is not currently available for sale in the U.S.

With the help of scientists in Cambridge, Queensland and Western Australia, Preston and Wild Child Technical Director John Found are now investigating the potential for one of the indigenous Australian plant oils as a powerful natural insecticide and antibacterial agent. This essential oil, which is used in Wild Child products, is being tested for use in developing nations to combat malaria and to improve hygiene.

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